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REVIEWS 2022

Murder at Peacock Hall
by
Kathryn Attwood

Murder at Peacock Hall was a roaring success with thanks to all involved, and the fantastic staff at The King's Head who greeted us with such enthusiasm and made us all feel very welcome. They even got right into the spirit and dressed up too!

 

Relatively few tables correctly guessed the identity of the murderer which made our job of awarding the prize for the best guess quite easy! In contrast, it was much harder to decide on the best dressed table as so many audience members arrived looking fabulous in their 1930s costumes.

 

The audience, pub staff, cast and crew had so much fun, and we are all looking forward to the next time. Keep your eyes peeled for further news!

November 2022

A review by our friend,

Alex Plowman:

Murder at Peacock Hall by the talented Kathryn Attwood had the audience grasped in its deadly grip as the BDS brought this cast of Cluedo characters uproariously to life (and death) in the King’s Head during a superb evening of high drama and intense sleuthing.

It’s the 1930s and heartless scoundrel Royston Peacock (Ben Valley) and his put-upon wife Joan (Diana Pospisil) are hosting a dinner party. Things don’t go quite according to plan when somebody winds up dead.

 

Under the brilliant direction of Denise Robinson and Peter Burton, some of the usual suspects of BDS became … the usual suspects: Peacock’s glitzy yet tipsy mistress Clarissa Scarlett (Ted Gooda); Mrs White (Julia Jepps), grumpy cook and wielder of carving-knife; Professor Plum (Davie Robertson), a bicycling inventor with a waistcoat full of weapons; Colonel Mustard (Barry Syder), a bombastic boomer prone to waggling a loaded revolver at people; and Reverend Green (John Pounder), who’s more of a hand-wringer rather than a bell-ringer.

But whodunnit? Cue Inspector Waddington (Will Gooda) to attempt to find out who did the foul deed. What was he writing down in his little notebook? It was down to the audience to see if we could do any better, but the plotting was as devious and cunning as the murderer themselves. We were kept guessing until the very end. All in all it was a fabulous performance and a fabulous evening.

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